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International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers

December 17, 2013

In honor of the International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers and the recent blog series on sex work and academics I’ve been working on here is this article from the LA Times.

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/opinion-la/la-ol-sex-workers-end-violence-december-17-20131216,0,5694340.story#ixzz2nlKh4JK3http://www.latimes.com/opinion/opinion-la/la-ol-sex-workers-end-violence-december-17-20131216,0,5694340.story

In case you don’t want to read the article the specific bit I’m going to talk about is this;

“Are sex workers’ lives worth less than everyone else’s? An attorney in New York recently argued in the affirmative, telling a judge that his client was being too harshly punished for the murder of a transgender sex worker. His client, Rasheen Everett, was sentenced to 29 years for the murder of Amanda Gonzalez-Andujar. But attorney John Scarpa said the sentence was too severe because the victim, after all, was not part of “a higher end of the community,” and “shouldn’t that [sentence] be reserved for people who are guilty of killing certain classes of individuals?”

Now the article discusses more than this paragraph and I strongly urge you to read the entire thing. However, on this bit alone look at what an attorney was able to say in court with out huge community an social back lash.

Why is that? How does rape culture play a part in this? How does victim blaming and the idea that sex workers are less make statements lie these “ok” to say?

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From → Who Knows What

8 Comments
  1. Just read the article… That’s a shocking way to talk about other people. Profession, like race, religion, etc. should never come into it…

    • The judged called the attorney out on his words. All life is sacred no matter what. It’s shameful that we regard sex worker lives as less in our culture. Hopefully soon that will change.

  2. This is a corollary to the rich kid from Texas that killed four people and got off with probation. Some lives are considered more valuable than others and usually it’s measured by how much money they have.

  3. Thank you for posting.

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